Wednesday, 20 September 2017

#BookReview Det sista experimentet (The Last experiment) by Emma Ångström

Det sista experimentet by Emma Ångström
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

A young woman wakes up locked in a dark and cold room. She does not know where she is. She does not remember how she got there. It feels like she is living buried, as though she walks around in a coffin far below the ground. Someone seems to have plans for her, and the horrible truth is discovered soon.

The summer of 1995 is the hottest summer for decades and fourteen-year-old Dante is going to spend promising in picturesque Sundborn with his eccentric grandfather. There is also Signe who has a penchant for the occult and Dante's charismatic childhood friend Freja.

But the summer idyll is soon broken and a new world opens when Freja draws Dante into a whirlwind of black art and unknown forces.

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I'm disappointed! Emma Ångström debut book was great, but this one started off promising, but as the story progressed did I find myself more and more dissatisfied with the way the story took. 

Thankfully did I listen to the audiobook and it was a short book so it didn't take much time (double the speed and the hours flew by)! I spoil the book a bit now, so don't read the rest of the review if you don't want to have an inkling about the ending!

First, nothing really happened for the first half the book and then the last part of the book was really bad. It felt like reading a YA book, and the author throws in a lot of paranormal history since the main characters are teenagers and didn't have so much beforehand knowledge. But, for the reader (for me at least) was the way author had incorporated all this history plain boring to listen to. Perhaps, it would have worked better if I had cared more for the characters. Then, we have the last part, IDIOTS! I mean the last 1/3 of the book made me seriously irritated and I mentally just wanted the kids to sit down and watch the movie flatliners and see how bad it is to wonder what happens after death. IDIOTS!

Also, there is a side story with a kidnapped woman (obviously in present time) and that part was even worst to listen to and the conclusion of that story, the connection this had to the Dante and Freja's story in the past was neither surprising nor especially interesting.

Tuesday, 19 September 2017

#BookReview Caroline: Little House, Revisited by Sarah Miller @WmMorrowBooks

Caroline: Little House, Revisited by Sarah Miller
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

In this novel authorized by the Little House estate, Sarah Miller vividly recreates the beauty, hardship, and joys of the frontier in a dazzling work of historical fiction, a captivating story that illuminates one courageous, resilient, and loving pioneer woman as never before—Caroline Ingalls, "Ma" in Laura Ingalls Wilder’s beloved Little House books.

In the frigid days of February, 1870, Caroline Ingalls and her family leave the familiar comforts of the Big Woods of Wisconsin and the warm bosom of her family, for a new life in Kansas Indian Territory. Packing what they can carry in their wagon, Caroline, her husband Charles, and their little girls, Mary and Laura, head west to settle in a beautiful, unpredictable land full of promise and peril.

The pioneer life is a hard one, especially for a pregnant woman with no friends or kin to turn to for comfort or help. The burden of work must be shouldered alone, sickness tended without the aid of doctors, and babies birthed without the accustomed hands of mothers or sisters. But Caroline’s new world is also full of tender joys. In adapting to this strange new place and transforming a rough log house built by Charles’ hands into a home, Caroline must draw on untapped wells of strength she does not know she possesses.

For more than eighty years, generations of readers have been enchanted by the adventures of the American frontier’s most famous child, Laura Ingalls Wilder, in the Little House books. Now, that familiar story is retold in this captivating tale of family, fidelity, hardship, love, and survival that vividly reimagines our past.


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OK, I just wanted to say that this book, I really wanted to love the story more than I did. I love the TV series and the books the show is also good. And, this book is one that I really, really looked forward to reading. However, I found that the story never really got to me.

I liked the whole idea of reading the book from Caroline's perspective, as a young wife and mother on her way to a new home. Her fears as she is pregnant and the whole idea of leaving everything and everyone behind got to me. It's just the everyday worries during the travel, well it felt a bit tedious to read about. Sure, it was interesting, but at the same time did I feel that it went on and one now and then. 

I liked the idea of the book, about reading about Charles, Caroline, and the children traveling to Kansas. If you have read the books and/or seen the TV series is this a must read. Sure, I found the story not perhaps living up to my expectations, but at the same time was it interesting to get Caroline's POV on leaving the old life behind. And, her worries about the baby was the thing that really got to me, just the thought of how worrisome everything would be, not even knowing if there would be someone in Kansas there to help her with the birthing. I just wish the story had been a bit more moving or in some way more engrossing. 

I almost forgot to bring up the best thing, Mr. Edwards. I was so thrilled when he showed up. He's my favorite character and he did bring much enjoyment to the book and I loved reading about how he saved Christmas for the children. I can't believe that I almost forgot this. So, there were some bright spots in this boo, like the presence of Mr. Edwards. 

I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy through Edelweiss for an honest review!

Monday, 18 September 2017

#CoverReveal Seven Seconds by Lisa Compton (@LisaCompton1210) @PerpetuityBooks


Seven Seconds by Lisa Compton marks the debut of a thrilling paranormal crime series.

Olivia Osborne, a forensic psychologist and former FBI agent, is blessed (or cursed depending on who you ask) with unique gifts. Olivia is able to sense what others cannot--the spiritual presence of those who have "crossed over," as well as the living who are influenced, or some cases possessed, by evil. The passing of her beloved Gran was the catalyst Olivia Osborn needed to leave the FBI behind and return to her native San Antonio. But a familiar evil has followed her home. 

When a series of brutal murders rock her hometown of San Antonio, Texas, Olivia is pulled into the investigation despite her plans to leave that part of her life behind. What if she isn’t supposed to run? What if she was always supposed to stand and fight?
  
Seven Seconds will launch in December 2017 through all major retailers in eBook, paperback, and hard cover formats. 

Additional information about the author can be found at www.Perpetuitybooks.com.

Sunday, 17 September 2017

#BookReview Close to Home by Robert Dugoni @AmazonPub

Close to Home by Robert Dugoni
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

While investigating the hit-and-run death of a young boy, Seattle homicide detective Tracy Crosswhite makes a startling discovery: the suspect is an active-duty serviceman at a local naval base. After a key piece of case evidence goes missing, he is cleared of charges in a military court. But Tracy knows she can’t turn her back on this kind of injustice.

When she uncovers the driver’s ties to a rash of recent heroin overdoses in the city, she realizes that this isn’t just a case of the military protecting its own. It runs much deeper than that, and the accused wasn’t acting alone. For Tracy, it’s all hitting very close to home.

As Tracy moves closer to uncovering the truth behind this insidious conspiracy, she’s putting herself in harm’s way. And the only people she can rely on to make it out alive might be those she can no longer trust.


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I was not sure that I would like this book or not. I have felt that the spark has gone out of this series while reading the last couple of books, and the one before this one was a real struggle to finish. However, I decided to give this series one more chance since I did like the first book very much.

So, how was it? To be honest, did I struggle at first with the book. The story did feel better than in the previous book, but I was several times mentally debating if I should stop reading or not since the story didn't offer any big surprises and it felt a bit sluggish. However, the story picked up when Dugoni decided to twist the story in a way that I did not foresee (thanks to not reading the blurb before starting the book) and then it got much better.

I'm not a big fan of reading about drugs, but one of the cops nieces overdosed before the events in this book, and for him did it get very personal to stop the deadly heroin from killing more people than it had already done by then. Then, we have the kid that was killed by a hit-and-run driver that case is also tragic. I was a bit surprised about how much of the story the blurb gives away. As I wrote before did I did not read the blurb before starting the book. I seldom do since they often give away too much information. And, here I was painstakingly trying to keep spoilers to the minimum and the blurb gives away several key factors. Why do I even bother? Anyway, I'm glad that I had not read the blurb before, that made some things more surprising and kept me interested in continuing reading the book.

Close to Home is an upswing from the book before. Not as interesting as the first book in the series, but interesting enough that I will read the next book in the series, especially because the way the book ended...

I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy through NetGalley for an honest review!

Friday, 15 September 2017

#BookReview Last Breath by Robert Bryndza (@RobertBryndza) @bookouture

Last Breath by Robert Bryndza
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

He’s your perfect date. You’re his next victim.

When the tortured body of a young woman is found in a dumpster, her eyes swollen shut and her clothes soaked with blood, Detective Erika Foster is one of the first at the crime scene. The trouble is, this time, it’s not her case.

While she fights to secure her place on the investigation team, Erika can’t help but get involved and quickly finds a link to the unsolved murder of a woman four months earlier. Dumped in a similar location, both women have identical wounds – a fatal incision to their femoral artery.

Stalking his victims online, the killer is preying on young pretty women using a fake identity. How will Erika catch a murderer who doesn’t seem to exist?

Then another girl is abducted while waiting for a date. Erika and her team must get to her before she becomes another dead victim, and, come face to face with a terrifyingly sadistic individual.

Gripping, tense and impossible to put down, Last Breath will have you on the edge of your seat, racing to the final dramatic page.


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First I want to say that this series is great and that you really should start to read them from the beginning. Sure, they are readable as stand alone, but I think it's worthwhile to read from the start, to get to know, Erika, Moss, Peterson and the rest of the characters from the very start.

One of the reasons that I like this series so much is that I enjoy reading about Erika Foster, who is still struggling to move on after her husband was killed in the line of duty. She's practically married to her work and, despite her cautious steps towards a new relationship is Mark still present in her life, despite him being dead for so many years now. I do like to see her taking steps towards a relationship, she has not many friends and, despite being a good cop does she deserve a happy home life as well.

Robert Bryndza is such a great writer and he really manages to write compelling stories that just makes you think one more chapter and suddenly you are halfway through the book. And, Last Breath is not an exception. I'm not always that fond of following the killers POV, when you know who he is from the start, name, and everything, but now and then it works. And, this time it did. And, let me tell you that is one sicko. A really creepy dude that appalled me. But, then again, his family, the milieu he has grown up in seemed not really have made it easier for him. Still, something must be seriously wrong in his head.

Luckily Erika manages to persuade Sparks to let her take on the case. I was a bit surprised over the fact that it did seem like Erika and Sparks were finally burying the hatchet. Although without giving away too much, did Bryndza manage to really surprise me here. You just have to read and find out for yourself.

A great book, just as the previous and a must read if you like this series!

I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy through NetGalley for an honest review!

#BookReview Angel: Out of the Past by Corinna Bechko

Angel: Out of the Past by Corinna Bechko
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Angel, a reformed vampire cursed with a soul, is tormented by a vision linking his shameful past to something very big—and very bad—that is coming. As Angel and his friend Fred begin trying to solve the mystery, the goddess Illyria gives Angel some insight and incentive. Then she really gets involved, and Angel discovers that it might be possible to change the future by changing the past.

Taken by Illyria, Angel and Fred find themselves in Illyria’s ancient past. The goddess claims it is a mistake, but when she discovers just when they are—in the middle of a battle between her past self and another god—she’s not ready to leave without attempting to change the battle’s outcome.

With no choice, Angel must help both past and present Illyria in a battle for their people and their land…

Collects Angel Season 11 issues #1-#4.


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Angel: Out of the Past was (thankfully) short so it didn't take much time reading it. The story isn't that memorable, with Angel and Fred going back in time to help Illyria destroy another god.   

Well, what to say other than this graphic novel really didn't turn out the way I expected it to do. I was charmed by the lovely cover and then I was seriously disappointed with both the art and the story. OK, the story was not totally bad, but at the same time was it not totally good. I have never been a big fan of Fred, and reading a whole graphic novel about her and Illyria was not really my cup of tea. 

I gave the graphic novel 3 stars at first, but as I was sitting down to write this review did I ask myself did I enjoy it enough to give it 3 stars? I mean the art was cringeworthy, they didn't even look like the characters from the TV series. And, neither was the art that appealing. It was just not the kind of art that I like, too sloppy. 


I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy through Edelweiss for an honest review!

Thursday, 14 September 2017

#CoverCrush The Flicker of Old Dreams by Susan Henderson

For new visitors do I want to explain that Cover Crush is something that my friend Erin over at Flashlight Commentary came up with and I adopted the idea together with some other friends. And, now we try to put up a Cover Crush every week. You can check below my pick of the week for their choices this week!


With the quiet precision of Jane Smiley’s A Thousand Acres and the technical clarity of Mary Roach’s Stiff, this is a novel about a young woman who comes most alive while working in her father’s mortuary in a small, forgotten Midwestern town

“The dead come to me vulnerable, sharing their stories and secrets…

Mary Crampton has spent all of her thirty years in Petroleum, a small Midwestern town once supported by a powerful grain company. Living at home, she works as the embalmer in her father’s mortuary: an unlikely job that has long marked her as an outsider. Yet, to Mary there is a satisfying art to positioning and styling each body to capture the essence of a subject’s life.

Though some townsfolk pretend that the community is thriving, the truth is that Petroleum is crumbling away—a process that began twenty years ago when an accident in the grain elevator killed a beloved high school athlete. The mill closed for good, the train no longer stopped in town, and Robert Golden, the victim’s younger brother, was widely blamed for the tragedy and shipped off to live elsewhere. Now, out of the blue, Robert has returned to care for his terminally ill mother. After Mary—reserved, introspective, and deeply lonely—strikes up an unlikely friendship with him, shocking the locals, she finally begins to consider what might happen if she dared to leave Petroleum.

Set in America’s heartland, The Flicker of Old Dreams explores themes of resilience, redemption, and loyalty in prose as lyrical as it is powerful.

Some thoughts about the cover:

I love the open field and the blue sky. I get the sense of serenity when I see the cover and even though the cover doesn't show much more than that is it one that I find in all its simplicity, beautiful!    

Check out what my friends have picked for Cover Crush's this week:

Stephanie @ Layered Pages






indieBRAG

Wednesday, 13 September 2017

#BookReview Taste of Marrow by Sarah Gailey (@gaileyfrey) (@torbooks)

Taste of Marrow by Sarah Gailey
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A few months ago, Winslow Houndstooth put together the damnedest crew of outlaws, assassins, cons, and saboteurs on either side of the Harriet for a history-changing caper. Together they conspired to blow the damn that choked the Mississippi and funnel the hordes of feral hippos contained within downriver, to finally give America back its greatest waterway.

Songs are sung of their exploits, many with a haunting refrain: "And not a soul escaped alive."

In the aftermath of the Harriet catastrophe, that crew has scattered to the winds. Some hunt the missing lovers they refuse to believe have died. Others band together to protect a precious infant and a peaceful future. All of them struggle with who they've become after a long life of theft, murder, deception, and general disinterest in the strictures of the law.


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I'm seriously tempted to re-read the first novella in this series after finishing Taste of Marrow. This novella had everything that I hoped River of Teeth would have, a compelling story and characters that I cared for. I had some trouble getting to know and keep apart all the character (and hippos) when I read River of Teeth. But, this time it went fine. So, perhaps it was just me and not the story?

Anyway, this novella is a fast read, a what-if story about what would have happened if hippos was imported to the marshlands of Louisiana and the story takes place just a couple of month's after the ending of River of Teeth with Winslow Houndstooth's group split and he's now fearing that Hero is dead and desperately trying to find him/her. Hero (who is traveling with Adelia after she saved his life), on the other hand well, has a problem of his/her (he is mentioned as they during the book which trust me is confusing) own when Adelia's baby is being kidnapped and they have to get her back. And, that leads to new problems. A lot of action during this short novella, just the way I liked it! Btw, you just probably read River of Teeth before reading this one. Much easier to understand what happened and who they all are if one reads the first novella.

Taste of Marrow is great and I'm waiting eagerly for the next installment to be published!


I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy through Netgalley for an honest review!